Spokane and the Nation: The Influenza Epidemic of 1918-19

Headline: “School Doctor Gives ‘Flu’ Aid”

Source: Spokesman-Review, October 18, 1918 page 6

Subject: Children affected; Spokane deaths

Synopsis: Parents of infected children are urged to call Dr. J.E. Drake for advice on how to treat the disease. 179 new cases of influenza were reported to the health office on October 17. Six new deaths were also reported. Dr. J.B. Anderson said that he expects the city wide quarantine to last another 7-10 days.

Notable Quotations:

• “Dr. Anderson is giving no encouragement for the lifting of the influenza quarantine short of another week or 10 days.”

• “Ninety of the influenza cases were reported by one physician and covered three days’ calls by him.”

• “Christ Piciales, age 35, a sawyer at Elk River, Idaho, died on Wednesday at the Lewis and Clark sanitarium into which he walked the day before with influenza.”

“School Doctor Gives ‘Flu’ Aid”

Are Ill – Urges Veils Be Worn

Ill – Urges Veils Be Worn by Attendants.

Six Deaths in the City

Physicians Report 179 New Cases – Thirty Enter Hospital in Lion Hotel.

Any family having school children who are supposed to have influenza, is requested to call Dr. J.E. Drake, school physician, Main 3363, when doctor or nurse will call and give medical advice. Although many of the cases are simple grippe it is highly contagious and it would be well for those attending the patients to wear a gauze veil while in the room with them, Dr. Drake says. Owing to the high degree of contagion, those suffering from it should be segregated from the rest of the family.

            The dental clinic is still running and children can attend as usual.

Six deaths, eight new pneumonia cases and 179 new cases of Spanish influenza were reported yesterday to the city health office. Ninety of the influenza cases were reported by one physician and covered three days’ calls by him.

            F.L. Ralson, age 33, died of influenza in the Lewis and Clark sanitarium last night. He was a salesman in the employ of John W. Graham & Co. A search for his relatives is being made by Smith & Co., who have charge of the body.

            George T. Petheram, age 33, a civil engineer for the Weyerhaeuser interests, died at his home, E221 Cleveland avenue, yesterday. Mr. Petheram developed influenza at Pullman, while going to Idaho a week ago, and pneumonia three days ago. He had been a resident of the state 15 years and came to Spokane seven months ago. He is survived by a widow, Mrs. Emily Elizabeth Petheram, three children, and a sister, Mrs. P.C. Bair, W1421 Maxwell avenue. He was a member of the Masons and consistory at North Yakima under the auspices of which organization the funeral will be held. The body is at Smith & Co’s.

Walked to Hospital; Died Next Day.

            Christ Piciales, age 35, a sawyer at Elk River, Idaho, died on Wednesday at the Lewis and Clark sanitarium into which he walked the day before with influenza. He was a native of Greece and had no relatives in this country except a second cousin. Funeral services will be held in the chapel of Smith & Co. at 2:30 p.m., today, the Rev. James A. Palmer of Holy Trinity Episcopal church officiating.

            Mrs. Christina Pitcher, age 23, died of pneumonia, preceded by influenza, at her home, N1428 Regal street, yesterday. Her husband, Henry, recovered recently from influenza and their two children had the same malady yesterday. Private burial services will be held in the New England chapel, Hillyard, at 2 p.m., today.

            Robert Warren Stafford Jr., age 13, died at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Stafford, E1808 Bridgeport avenue, yesterday afternoon of the influenza and heart trouble. The body is at the Turnbull rooms.

            Mrs. George Schafer, age 36, died at her home, W4017 Hoffman avenue, yesterday, of the influenza. She is survived by a husband. The body is at Schooley’s.

Ban to Last Week or 10 Days.

            Dr. Anderson is giving no encouragement for the lifting of the influenza quarantine short of another week or 10 days. His action in this respect, he stated yesterday to a minister, will depend upon how the epidemic develops:

            An order prohibiting street railway companies from taking on board passengers for whom no seats are to be found, was issued yesterday afternoon. This was done to eliminate the “strap hanger” and the consequent close assemblage of a number of people in a street car.

            R.A. Willson, manager of railways for the Washington Water Power company, called at the health office yesterday evening to say that his company would gladly comply with the order.

Thirty in New Hospital.

            The influenza hospital, which the city and county have opened in the Lion hotel, was receiving patients yesterday afternoon at 4 o’clock, and by nightfall 30 patients were installed with six nurses in attendance for night duty. No one is allowed to enter the place without a permit from Doctor Stuht or Dr. Anderson.