Spokane and the Nation: The Influenza Epidemic of 1918-1919

Headline: “Nurses Will Render Aid to all Influenza Cases”

Source: Spokane Daily Chronicle, October 10, 1918, page 2

Subject: role of the nurses during the epidemic

Synopsis: The article gives praise to the local nurses of Spokane for their courage by volunteering to help those infected with influenza.  According to Health Officer J.B. Anderson, every nurse has pledged herself to render aid to those with influenza.  An act such as this shows their devotion to others and to their country.

Notable Quotation:

• “Every trained nurse, both graduate and practical, in Spokane has pledged herself to render aid to persons stricken with Spanish influenza, both in the city and the country districts, according to Health officer J. B. Anderson.”

Observation: Throughout history, women have often played the role of the unsung heroine in many wars.  They have routinely put their lives on the line without getting praised for their reverent sacrifice.

"Nurses Will Render Aid To All Influenza Cases"

Every One in Spokane Has Pledged Herself to Help in the Work.

         Every trained nurse, both graduate and practical, in Spokane has pledged herself to render aid to persons stricken with Spanish influenza, both in the city and the country districts, according to Health Officer J.B. Anderson.

         “Nurses will not spend any great length of time with one patient,” said Dr. Anderson, “but will visit all, give proper instructions for the care of the afflicted person and then visit the next patient. It would be impossible for a nurse to spend 24 hours or longer with one patient when a great number of cases exist, as may in case of an epidemic. The nurses will, in fact, act as physicians.”

In the County.

         “This arrangement also applies to the country [sic?] districts where we will send practical nurses who will work under direction of a graduate nurse. Every health officer and branch of the Red Cross in the Inland Empire has been asked to report on local situations.

“The nursing will be done without remuneration where necessary, but if patients are able to pay they should regard payment as a patriotic duty. The nurses will be doing such duty at great loss of time and convenience. Those who may be visited should consider this.”