Spokane and the Nation: The Influenza Epidemic of 1918-1919

Headline: “Make Vaccine for Influenza”

Source: Spokesman-Review, October 13, 1918, page 11

Subject: Vaccine tested at Washington State College; classes to resume

Synopsis: Dr. J.W. Kalkus of Washington State College has been working with the veterinary department there to make a vaccine that might prevent people from getting sick. Classes at the college are scheduled to resume the next day. It is assumed that the danger of an epidemic on the campus has passed.

Notable Quotations:

• “Extensive experimentation will be carried on in an effort to produce a vaccine that will be available for general use in combating the epidemic.”

• “Since the issuing of the order by the city health office Thursday closing all public meeting places, few cases that might under any diagnosis be classed as influenza have developed and it is thought that all danger of a general epidemic is past.”

“Make Vaccine for Influenza”

Dr. Kalkus, Pathologist at State College, Takes Germs From Victims.

Carry on Experiments

All Classes Will Be Resumed Tomorrow – Few Cases of Students in Mild Form.

WASHINGTON STATE COLLEGE, PULLMAN, Oct. 12 – Vaccine for Spanish influenza is being manufactured at the state college by Dr. J.W. Kalkus, pathologist with the college of veterinary science, who this morning isolated influenza germs from phlegm expelled by several patients who were under the charge of City Health Officer J.L. Gilleland. These germs, together with blood from a sheep, are being made into the vaccine, which it is thought will provide a preventive for the disease. Extensive experimentation will be carried on in an effort to produce a vaccine that will be available for general use in combating the epidemic.

Classes Resume Tomorrow.

            All classes at the state college will be continued as usual Monday morning, this decision having been reached by college officials following a conference with Dr. R.J. Skaife, county health officer, and Captain J.S. Collins, medical officer for both branches of the S.A.T.C. at the college.

            Few cases that might be classed as Spanish influenza have developed among the students and these are of very mild form.

Will Isolate Cases of Colds.

            Every precaution will be taken to prevent the spread of any epidemic. If it becomes necessary a building will be secured for a hospital and all cases of colds will be isolated.

            Since the issuing of the order by the city health office Thursday closing all public meeting places, few cases that might under any diagnosis be classed as influenza have developed and it is thought that all danger of a general epidemic is past.